Greg Natale’s Trends for 2021

One of Australia’s leading designers, when Greg Natale looks into his crystal ball makes interior trend predictions we sit up and take notice. Read on for his take on what we will be coveting in 2021

Curves


Archways are having a revival thanks to architects and designers adding curved doorways, rounded windows and arched mirrors to their projects. Arches offer a new way to add more organic shapes inside our homes, not only through archways but also through decorative patterns, furnishings and accessories with rounded edges and tubular forms. 

“During work on an Art Deco-inspired residence, I embraced the lines of the era in the interior architecture, taking the curved rectangular shape of the entrance and recreating it in the ceiling coffers, adding moulding for definition. The result is a restrained and elegant layer of detail that suits the house’s soft palette of blush pink, grey and white. Again, ensuring that the ceilings were part of the overall design, I echoed that shape throughout the house in cabinetry and mirrors, adding warmth via brass trims,” says Greg.

Ceilings

Ceilings look set for the spotlight next year but it’s an area of the room that Greg has always focussed on. “When I’m designing a space, the walls and ceilings are among my first considerations. They’re an essential layer of the architecture, and a wonderful way of introducing pattern into the framework of a room, helping to define its look and add interest and drama. Panelling, coffers and cornices are beautiful design tools that showcase how moulding can transform a space,” says Greg.

Greg demonstrated this in a recent Sydney project where he introduced round Gyprock ceiling coffers to complement the home’s grand entrance that features a double curved staircase, a circular rug and round table. “It’s about treating your ceilings as part of the design to create a cohesive look,” says Greg.

“During work on an Art Deco-inspired residence, I embraced the lines of the era in the interior architecture, taking the curved rectangular shape of the entrance and recreating it in the ceiling coffers, adding moulding for definition. The result is a restrained and elegant layer of detail that suits the house’s soft palette of blush pink, grey and white. Again, ensuring that the ceilings were part of the overall design, I echoed that shape throughout the house in cabinetry and mirrors, adding warmth via brass trims,” says Greg.

Rich Hues 

While neutral colours will never go out of style, it’s the richer hues that Greg has his eye on for 2021.  “I think cobalt blue, maroon, brick, rust, teal and green will be big,” says Greg. Another of Greg’s favourite hues, navy looks set to continue its reign; not only does it bring a sophisticated masculinity to a room, but whether used on a feature wall, furniture or accessories, the colour does have a certain luxe factor.

“During work on an Art Deco-inspired residence, I embraced the lines of the era in the interior architecture, taking the curved rectangular shape of the entrance and recreating it in the ceiling coffers, adding moulding for definition. The result is a restrained and elegant layer of detail that suits the house’s soft palette of blush pink, grey and white. Again, ensuring that the ceilings were part of the overall design, I echoed that shape throughout the house in cabinetry and mirrors, adding warmth via brass trims,” says Greg.

The COVID-19 Effect

With most people’s travel plans quashed, we’ve already seen a huge uptick in home renovations as people really embrace home life and it’s something Greg has noticed in his own work.

“With families spending so much time at home, home and garden renovations will be very popular. There will also be a big emphasis on the home office, online shopping for homewares and I think hyper designer hand sanitisers will be big too!” says Greg.

“During work on an Art Deco-inspired residence, I embraced the lines of the era in the interior architecture, taking the curved rectangular shape of the entrance and recreating it in the ceiling coffers, adding moulding for definition. The result is a restrained and elegant layer of detail that suits the house’s soft palette of blush pink, grey and white. Again, ensuring that the ceilings were part of the overall design, I echoed that shape throughout the house in cabinetry and mirrors, adding warmth via brass trims,” says Greg.

Painted Cornices

“Cornices can play a key part in a design – and they don’t always need to be white. In one of my projects, I painted the cornices black, which not only works to curb the large proportions but also to dramatically define and outline the space. I know people are hesitant to outline rooms, but this can work just as effectively in smaller spaces, such as the bedrooms and bathrooms of this house, where painting the cornices black added beautiful definition,” says Greg.

“During work on an Art Deco-inspired residence, I embraced the lines of the era in the interior architecture, taking the curved rectangular shape of the entrance and recreating it in the ceiling coffers, adding moulding for definition. The result is a restrained and elegant layer of detail that suits the house’s soft palette of blush pink, grey and white. Again, ensuring that the ceilings were part of the overall design, I echoed that shape throughout the house in cabinetry and mirrors, adding warmth via brass trims,” says Greg.

Mixed Materials

While marble has been a popular material for a while now, Greg thinks we’ll start to see blue marble making a splash – think blue lapis or Brazil’s exotic Azul Bahia granite. “I also think boucle fabric will be big, as will stone basins and hand-painted wallpapers,” says Greg who thinks the ombre effect will be seen everywhere too. “Ombre fabric, wallpaper or even tiles will be popular.”

“During work on an Art Deco-inspired residence, I embraced the lines of the era in the interior architecture, taking the curved rectangular shape of the entrance and recreating it in the ceiling coffers, adding moulding for definition. The result is a restrained and elegant layer of detail that suits the house’s soft palette of blush pink, grey and white. Again, ensuring that the ceilings were part of the overall design, I echoed that shape throughout the house in cabinetry and mirrors, adding warmth via brass trims,” says Greg.

Looking for more inspiration?

Gyprock has just launched the new Gyprock Living Simple to Stunning magazine with design tips to show how elevated design thinking coupled with great craftsmanship can take a basic building material like Gyprock and shape them into timeless, sophisticated architecture.

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